Skilling up for Cloud architecture & planning

Yesterday I had the mother of all days in London, hot and muggy, multiple trains, tubes and walking my feet off whilst getting out and about talking Cloud. I was sat, gratefully, on an almost empty train with aircon and it gave me time to sit down with a pad and paper and to get some thoughts down around some of the precursors to Cloud from an Enterprise perspective and I want to share them with you in the form of steps you can take today to build a level of management skillsets towards enterprise Open Cloud adoption and design.

The Red Hat multi faceted approach to technology encompasses support, design, release and management of software across enterprise and datacentre alike but a significant percentage of annual revenue comes from the demand for our training services under the auspices of the Red Hat University. For over a decade we’ve turned out thousands of certified technicians and management across companies globally who are then armed locally not just to manage Red Hat platforms but to make qualified assessments and decisions around legacy and heterogeneous environments. The RHCE (Red Hat Certified Engineer) has been the badge of honour for many years of the techno savvy across companies globally, and now entry level RHCSA (Red Hat Certified System Administrator) allowing an introductory path to ongoing certification and training pre RHCE study and certification.

Adding to the multiple Red Hat certified qualifications and training there is a great course that is designed for architects, system administrators, and J2EE/JBoss developers alike that offers adoptees a significant leg up towards Cloud understanding at every level. Designed for students who already have achieved their base entry RHCSA as a minimum. The Red Hat Cloud Architecture workshop is a two day course that we deliver globally and that is solving many of the thought issues around provisioning, re-use of legacy hardware and applications and also the missing piece of Cloud for many enterprise customers – governance and planning where costs can often account for up to fifty percent of longterm Cloud adoption if not understood and managed properly.

Giving a proper appreciation of the requirements around planning and building IaaS platforms, looking at the tacit design and thought processes around successful design of private and public cloud, application design specifics and planning the whole provisioning lifecycle of Cloud. We bring the ability to the classroom to allow those in the room to be able to deploy hosts and vm’s and to really get to grips with understanding every angle of ownership around the management requirements of a successful Cloud deployment and how the whole hybrid Cloud model works. Giving customers a real world appreciation of planning, provisioning, scalability and allowing enterprises to get to Cloud quicker with confidence and with the inhouse skilling of key personnel should be a potential boost for many enterprises.

If you want to add to that as an individual there are then a multitude of courses and exams on everything from RHEV to SELinux for individual staffers to become platform specialists and to allow you as an organisation to develop a best of breed approach to your Cloud needs – you can find more information here.

Are you Cloud ready ?

We’ve made available for some time our Cloud Readiness Assessment Guide (registration required but takes minutes to step through) which is free to use and easy to work through and delivers you an automated assessment / appraisal of your readiness. Invaluable and something that as it’s made available freely should really be a no-brainer to work through.

You’ll also find a bunch of whitepapers and a video with Bryan Che around planning and assessment phases of Cloud online here. We also have our Cloud webinars that I know from feedback a few of you have already discovered via this blog.

If theres anything more you want or need to know please reach out to me directly or to your local in country Red Hat product teams and we’ll react promptly.